A Native of the Land: Deriving an Ethic of Intercultural Relations from Exodus, Part 5

Having dealt with God and the Egyptians, the focus now must shift to the lesser known cast off characters quietly populating the pages of Exodus. There are a number of other tribes and nations scattered throughout the book whose relationship to God is on the surface level at least troubling. On several occasions God either orders […]

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“Lazarus got what was left.”

Clarence Jordan was unusual.  After earning a PhD in Greek from Southern Seminary in Louisville, he, his wife, and another couple left the academic world and at the height of Southern racial apartheid founded Koinonia Farm in southwest Georgia.  The farm’s mission was to model a holistic community – a community dedicated to interracial fellowship, […]

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Jus Ad Bellum or Just Bull: The Christian, War, and Hope for a Peaceful Future (Part 2)

This is Part 2 of my series on war and the Christian. Remember model UN in high school.  Well, I don’t because we didn’t have it, but essentially it’s where students pretend to be world leaders and make big decisions.  Let’s play model UN for a minute. Let’s pretend the UN can’t figure out what […]

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Jus Ad Bellum or Just Bull: The Christian, War, and Hope For A Peaceful Future (Part 1)

In 1918 the United States entered the most violent war in history up to that time. Two famous Christians had two diametrically inverted responses. First, William Jennings Bryan.  Few know him today.  A century ago “The Great Commoner” was a household name across America.  Vocal Christian, Populist crusader, presidential contender, perceived goat of the infamous […]

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